How Millennials Can Save Underdeveloped Countries

September 22, 2017

As millennials, we are used to taking care of our planet, and we believe in gender and race equality. At the same time, however, we are a selfish generation. We are immersed in a virtual world where all that matters is the amount of “likes” we get on Instagram or Facebook.

 

Photo: Kyle Glenn on Unsplash  

 

I have seen how involved we can be. We take great care of pets and animals, we watch what we eat, we become conscious of how food is made, how it’s grown, and what happens, step by step, before it gets onto our plates. We even care about how our clothes are made, too. But when it comes to politics, I don’t see a lot of involvement from our generation.

 

Part of me thinks that we are tired of watching our politicians make bad decisions, stealing from our own country, and not being leaders, to the point where we don’t trust  the government, or anyone else, even if they promise to make a big change.

 

We come from an older generation (our parents and grandparents) who lived under a government in which everything was “under control.” This was the case because the government put too much pressure on everyone. People were seriously punished if they said anything bad about the government or politicians.

 

I have wondered how to help all countries around the world grow. First world countries, I’ve thought, could still donate money to underdeveloped countries, as it is clear that the millennials will not get involved in politics and are not interested in fighting the old system.

 

Because we care so deeply about so many things, as I mentioned earlier, we should start to develop new systems to make life better and easier for less fortunate countries. To give a better example, our country is known for its agricultural plots of land, and since we care so much about the conditions of our food, we should start giving food to poorer countries. This could totally change the game.

 

There are also small companies that will accelerate the economy of third world countries by doing projects that involve technology or apps. This will help connect direct farmers to single buyers, skipping the long process from farms, to grocery stores, etc. Some other projects help by converting the fruit and vegetable waste into natural nutrients that improve the quality of processed food.

 

To me, these few examples are a great way for our generation to save the underdeveloped countries.

 

My name is Valeria García González. I’m 24, born and raised Mexican.  Majoring in fashion design, women empowerment supporter, sunset and shoe lover. Fun fact: I talk too much, people ask if I talk to myself when I’m all alone and yes… I do!

 

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